In Times of Bereavement

In the unfortunate event that a person has passed away, there are three things that must be done in the first few days;

  • Get a medical certificate from your GP or hospital doctor (this is necessary to register the death)
  • Register the death within 5 days (8 days in Scotland). You will then receive the necessary documents for the funeral.
  • Make the necessary funeral arrangements.

Register the death

If the death has been reported to the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) they must give permission before registering the death.

You can register the death if you are a relative, a witness to the death, a hospital administrator or the person making the arrangements with the funeral directors.

You can use the ‘Register a Death’ page on the gov.uk website that will guide you through the process. This will also explain the registration process for Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Arrange the funeral

The funeral can usually only take place after the death is registered. Most people use a funeral director, though you can arrange a funeral yourself.

Funeral directors

Choose a funeral director who’s a member of one of the following:

These organisations have codes of practice – they must give you a price list when asked.

Some local councils run their own funeral services, for example for non-religious burials. The British Humanist Association can also help with non-religious funerals.

Arranging the funeral yourself

Contact the Cemeteries and Crematorium Department of your local council to arrange a funeral yourself.

Funeral costs

Funeral costs can include:

  • funeral director fees
  • things the funeral director pays for on your behalf (called ‘disbursements’ or ‘third-party costs’), for example, crematorium or cemetery fees, or a newspaper announcement about the death
  • local authority burial or cremation fees

Funeral directors may list all these costs in their quotes.

Carers Information

Do you look after someone?

A carer is a person of any age (including children) who provides unpaid support to a partner, relative, friend or neighbour who couldn’t cope without their help. This could be due to old age, frailty, disability, a serious health condition, mental ill health or substance misuse. Parents of children who are disabled or who have a serious health condition are also considered to be carers.

There is a difference between a carer and care professionals paid to provide care. Some carers receive statutory payments (for example Carer’s Allowance) or a direct payment for their caring role. Even when carers receive such payments, they are still considered to be carers.

Carers UK estimate that there are around 6.5 million carers in the UK, meaning carers represent 10% of the UK population. This includes around 700,000 young carers (aged 17 or below) (www.cqc.org.uk). 

Please let us know if you look after some and talk to us about how you think we could help you.

Contact Carers Federation to find out more 01159629360 carers@carersfederation.co.uk

or visit Carers UK https://www.carersuk.org/

Non-NHS Services

Some services provided are not covered under our contract with the NHS and therefore attract charges. Examples include the following:

  • Medicals for pre-employment, sports and driving requirements (HGV, PSV etc.)
  • Insurance claim forms
  • Passport signing
  • Prescriptions for taking medication abroad
  • Private sick notes
  • Vaccination certificates
  • Some Travel Vaccinations
  • Hepatitis B Vaccine for Occupational Health

The fees charged are based on the British Medical Association (BMA) suggested scales and our reception staff will be happy to advise you about them along with appointment availability.

Travel Information

If you think you may require any vaccinations relating to foreign travel you need to complete a travel risk assessment form and hand in to reception at least 6 weeks prior to departure. This will include which countries and areas within countries that you are visiting to determine what vaccinations are required.

Travel Advice Leaflet for More Information

There is further information about countries and vaccinations required on the links below: 

Europe Europe & RussiaNorth America North America
Central America Central Americaindia South America
egypt Carribeanlithuania Africa
bulgaria Middle Eastpoland Central Asia
china East Asiachina Australasia and Pacific

Non-urgent advice: Please Note

It is important to hand this form in as early as possible – at least 6 weeks before you travel – as 2 appointments will be required with the practice nurse, a telephone consultation and then a face to face appointment to actually receive the vaccinations and be given the relevant health advice. These vaccines have to be ordered as they are not a stock vaccine. Your face to face appointment needs to be at least 2 weeks before you travel to allow the vaccines to work.

Some travel vaccines are ordered on a private prescription and these incur a charge over and above the normal prescription charge. This is because not all travel vaccinations are included in the services provided by the NHS.

If you have not allowed enough time to receive the vaccine, or if we are not able to actually administer a certain vaccine, you would need to go to a private travel clinic.  The local private clinic to us is located on Regent Street in Nottingham city centre.

Travel Health Questionnaire

To help us offer the appropriate advice, please fill out the online form before coming to see the nurse.

Please complete the form below to get more information about what travel immunisations you require. Most vaccines are given at least 2 weeks before travel, and some more complicated regimes take longer. Please try to give us prior notice (preferably 6 weeks).
Title
Date of Birth
Address
Email
Women Only: Is there any possibility you may be pregnant?
Destination(s)
UK Departure Date
Please enter a number from 0 to 99999.
Further Information
Purpose of your trip
Holiday type
Accommodation
Setting
Planned Activities
Are you fit for travel?
Do you have any allergies?